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Personal Injury Lawyer Dropped Your Case? Now What?

It happens all too often. A person hires a lawyer right after an accident, then months later when the medical treatment is all done, the lawyer they hired decides they no longer want the case. Don’t read into it too much. Some lawyers only handle cases if they are of a certain value or above. So unless your lawyer has ceased communicating with you, there are a few steps you can take to make sure your case can be smoothly transitioned over to a new attorney. However, if your lawyer has ceased communicating with you, it might be a good idea to get a new lawyer, and have your new lawyer attempt to connect with the old lawyer. On rare occasion, lawyers get sick, die, or just plainly go missing without warning, just like any other human being. The most important thing is to find out your statute of limitations date, because if you don’t file a lawsuit by that date, your claim will expire. 1. Ask Your Old Attorney to Delay Withdrawing Until You Find a New Attorney Attorneys will often recommend that you find a new attorney before they formally withdraw from representation, even when there has been a breakdown in the attorney-client relationship involving anger and animosity. Attorneys are generally agreeable to this arrangement because it will avoid injuring a client’s case. If you are firing your attorney, however, this request will likely not go over well. 2. Figure Out Your Lien Situation Personal injury cases, if handled on a contingency basis (which they typically are), may have lien provisions included in the attorney fee agreement. When an attorney drops your case, if your contract had one of these provisions, you need to get a letter from the attorney clearly stating whether they have a lien, or not, and if so, for how much. A lien is a typical contract term in a contingency fee contract that allows an attorney to place a claim for payment on your case, and requiring that they be paid from any eventual settlement or judgment issued in the case for the work they did on your case. When an attorney drops a case, they usually do not assert a lien, unless they have expended a significant amount of money or time on the case. Even then, some attorneys will release their liens in order to make it easier for a client to retain a new attorney, as a second attorney may be hesitant to take a case that has a lien attached to it. However, any new attorney will likely ask and want to know about liens before formally accepting representation. 3. Find and Hire a New Attorney Don’t delay. The longer you wait to find a new attorney, the less time the new attorney will have to prepare your case. FindLaw has a personal injury lawyer directory that you can browse for free to find an experienced injury attorney in your area. Related Resources: Injured in an accident? Get your claim reviewed by an attorney for free. (Consumer Injury) 5 Controversial Medical Treatments Still Used Today (FindLaw’s Injured) Chemical Spill in Kansas Hospitalizes Over 100 People (FindLaw’s Injured) Is Apple Liable for Distracted Driving Accidents? (FindLaw’s Injured)
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Prior Bad Acts: Who Can Testify in Bill Cosby’s Criminal Trial?

Bill Cosby is the elder statesman of American comedy whose life has turned into a bad drama, now including a criminal case. Next month, Cosby will return to criminal court in Pennsylvania for pretrial proceedings on three charges of felony indecent assault of Barbara Constand and faces ten years in prison if convicted. Despite the dozens of accusations of abuse that have surfaced from women all over the country, this is Cosby's first criminal prosecution. The case was filed just two days before the 12-year statute of limitations on such claims in Pennsylvania expired, according to USA Today. It raises many interesting legal questions, all complex. Today, let's consider prior bad acts and whether Cosby's other accusers can testify against him. Prior Bad Acts Generally speaking, a crime cannot be proven based on a defendant's behavior in other situations. While a criminal record informs sentencing, each crime must be proven based on the facts of the case at hand and not based on evidence of similar acts in the past . But for every rule in the law, there are important exceptions because a foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of small minds. That is to say, sometimes it makes sense to consider external evidence if it is highly relevant to the matter at hand. In a case like this one, where there are about 50 women saying that Cosby drugged and touched them without their consent, the prosecution will no doubt argue that it's relevant. Prosecutors will seek to admit evidence from other women whose stories are consistent with Constand's. To the extent that there are questions about the alleged victim's credibility because she waited a year to report the crime and thus there is no physical evidence, a slew of witnesses telling the same story would certainly support her claim that Cosby drugged and touched her against her will. Admitting the Evidence Admitting evidence of prior bad acts is not a given, however. The defense will no doubt fight it, relying on precedent to show that the stories would not be considered consistent evidence. The burden of proof on prosecutors is high -- they must show the evidence is more relevant than prejudicial. Dennis McAndrews, a former prosecutor, who teaches criminal law at Villanova University explained to reporters, according to USA Today: "It's very challenging because courts are reluctant. They hold the prosecution to a tight burden to establish that (the testimony) is highly relevant, that the facts of other cases are close to the case (on trial), and that the probative value significantly outweighs the prejudicial effect." In light of this, it is not yet clear that the judge will allow the testimony of other women to prove Bill Cosby assaulted Barbara Constand, But it's certain the Cosby's defense lawyers will challenge admission of that evidence at every turn. If he is convicted, admission of prior bad acts will be a major issue in the inevitable appeal. Accused? If you have been accused of a crime, don't delay. Meet with a criminal defense attorney today. Many lawyers consult for free or a minimal fee and will be happy to discuss your case. Related Resources: Find Criminal Defense Lawyers Near You (FindLaw's Lawyer Directory) Cosby Counterclaims Against 7 Accusers (FindLaw's Celebrity Justice) Cosby Complains in Court: Insurers Threaten Defamation Claim (FindLaw's Celebrity Justice) Model Drops Playboy Assault Case Against Cosby (FindLaw's Celebrity Justice) Janice Dickinson Sues Bill Cosby for Defamation (FindLaw's Celebrity Justice)
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IVC Blood Filter Plaintiffs Multiply: Should You Sue Too?

If you suffer from blood clotting complications, you have likely heard of IVC filters, formally known as inferior vena cava filters. These relatively commonly implanted medical devices have stirred up much controversy, and a bunch of lawsuits, and critics of the filters are increasingly asking if they are effective at all. So if you have an IVC filter, should you panic? No. But you should familiarize yourself with the dangers and if you’ve been injured due to a filter then you should consider a lawsuit. You will not be at all alone — according to the Lawyers and Settlements blog, there already nearly 1,000 such cases already. Why IVC Filters? Filters are implanted in the inferior vena cava of patients who can’t tolerate anti-coagulants or other medications designed to thin blood and prevent clots. The inferior vena cava is a large vein that carries deoxygenated blood to the heart from the lower body. IVC filters are described by the Food and Drug Administration as “cage-like devices” that are placed in the vein and designed to trap blood clot fragments. Unfortunately, the filters have a history of breaking and migrating inside patients, which causes serious injuries and even death. IVC filters have additionally been known to tilt or get stuck, to splinter, and to cause damage by perforating organs or tissues, and more. Studies also suggest that these filters can increase the risk of blood clots, rather than the intended effect of anti-coagulation. The Feds Recommend The FDA has issued guidance to physicians who have patients with retrievable IVC filters, advising them to remove filters as soon as possible. Some filters are designed to be temporary and some are meant to be left in permanently. Now, the FDA is saying that retrievable, temporary filters should be removed promptly, writing: The FDA encourages all physicians involved in the treatment and follow-up of patients receiving IVC filters to consider the risks and benefits of filter removal for each patient. A patient should be referred for IVC filter removal when the risk/benefit profile favors removal and the procedure is feasible given the patient’s health status. Suing for IVC Filter Injury Plaintiffs who have sued for IVC filter injuries complain that they were not warned of the risks associated with implantation of these devices. Hundreds of plaintiffs have reportedly filed suit since March alone, swelling the number of cases on the two major consolidated matters to nearly a thousand. To determine if you should sue too, speak to a lawyer. Talk to a Lawyer If you have been injured due to an IVC blood filter or by some other medical device, do not delay. Consult with a lawyer today. Many attorneys consult for free or a minimal fee and will be happy to discuss your claim. Related Resources: Hurt due to an IVC filter or other medical device? Get your claim reviewed for free. (Consumer Injury) IVC Blood Clot Filter Problems and FAQs (FindLaw’s Injured) How Dangerous Are Blood Clot Filters? (FindLaw’s Injured) How Long Can a Blood Clot Filter Be Left In? (FindLaw’s Injured)
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Repo Gone Wrong Ends in Manslaughter Charges

Would you die to save your car from a repo agent? That is what happened this week when a woman in Pleasant Grove, Utah crashed her vehicle during a high speed chase — she was trying to get away from a man who came to her door to repossess the vehicle. Now Ashleigh Best, 35, is dead, and Kenneth Drew, 49, is in jail on manslaughter charges. He denies driving Best to her death, reports the Daily Mail. Let’s consider this tragic accident and the legal limits on repossession. Mother Under Pressure Ashleigh Best was under pressure. It seems life in Pleasant Grove was not all pleasant. The mother of three was living with her husband and family at her parents’ house in order to get their finances together. When Kenneth Drew came knocking on the door to repossess the car, her husband begged Drew to wait and let him call the bank. The repo man reportedly said no and Ashleigh Best drove off in the car, hoping to save it from him. Drew gave chase, though the repo man denies he drove at high speeds, and Best crashed her car into a tree. She was pronounced dead at the scene. The company Drew works for, On Demand Repo, stated that its policy is not to chase people. As for their agent, they said Drew didn’t have a mean bone in his body and asked that people wait until the investigation concludes before deciding what happened. Pleasant Grove Police Lieutenant Britt Smith, however, told reporters, “I’ve never, in my 15 years of law enforcement, I’ve never seen a repo agent be this aggressive. I’ve never seen anything like it. It doesn’t justify chasing her down through the roads, city streets, at high rates of speeds, causing fatal traffic accidents. The end doesn’t justify the means.” Repossession Rules Smith’s statement raises the question — just how aggressive can a repo agent be? The rules for repossession depend on state statutes and these vary in the details. Some states require agents to notify police of any actions they will take. Others outline specific methods of approach. No state permits a breach of the peace. There are limitations on agents and that they cannot break the law in order to repossess property. Still, On Demand Repo also makes an important point, and one which is the cornerstone of criminal law. Kenneth Drew is accused of manslaughter, but he has not been proven guilty of causing the fatal accident. For now at least, he is innocent. Accused? If you are accused of a crime, don’t delay in getting legal advice. Many criminal defense attorneys consult for free or a minimal fee and will be happy to talk about your case. Related Resources: Find Criminal Defense Lawyers Near You (FindLaw’s Lawyer Directory) The Rich Aren’t That Different: They Have Repo Men Too (FindLaw’s Legally Weird) 3 Potential Ways to Sue a Repo Agent (FindLaw’s Injured) How to Get a Repossessed Car Back (FindLaw’s Learn About the Law)
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Your Significant Privacy Interest in Your Phone Doesn’t End at Border

Your phone now contains more information than ever before, more even than your home, and the courts recognize this. You do have a significant privacy interest in your phone and you can challenge a search of your tech just as you would a search of your car. Two years ago, the Supreme Court acknowledged the significant role of technology in our lives in Riley v. California. A recent case out of the Eastern District of Virginia, US v. Kolsuz, illustrates this, saying specifically that search of a smartphone at a border requires reasonable suspicion, according to legal analyst Orin Kerr. Let's consider what it means for you. Attached to our Phones Chief Justice Roberts, writing for a unanimous court in Riley v. California, was cognizant of the role that cell phones play in contemporary life, and our significant attachment to our tech. The phone are, he said, "such a pervasive and insistent part of daily life that the proverbial visitor from Mars might conclude they were an important feature of human anatomy." In the more recent case, US v Kolsuz, the court rejected prosecutors' attempts to distinguish between two kinds of searches -- an extensive cell phone search from a very extensive one. The court found that either type of forensic search of cell phone data invades privacy and requires a warrant. It noted that the government can reconstruct an individual's private life by putting together the data in the phone and wrote, "Thus although the forensic search of defendant's iPhone did not involve the copying of every bit of data contained on the phone's hard drive, it nonetheless implicated significant privacy interests. To suggest otherwise is like suggesting that a strip search does not implicate a significant privacy interest so long as the government does not look between the person's toes." Search and Seizure The courts are increasingly finding we have a significant privacy interest in our technology, and recent rulings indicate that police must treat personal items like smartphones as they would your home or person. But remember that these cases arise when someone is challenging what already happened. This means that in reality when you are at the border, authorities may ask to search your phone and it is up to you to say no. Even if your phone is taken, you significantly improve your chances of successfully challenging the search by clearly refusing to consent to it. Accused? If you have been accused of a crime, don't delay. Speak to a criminal defense attorney today. Many lawyers consult for free or a minimal fee and will be happy to assess your case. Related Resources: Find Criminal Defense Lawyers Near You (FindLaw's Lawyer Directory) Probable Cause (FindLaw's Learn About the Law) Police Misconduct and Civil Law (FindLaw's Learn About the Law) The Fourth Amendment Warrant Requirement (FindLaw's Learn About the Law)
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Interview of Rebecca LeGrand, Partner at Kaiser, LeGrand & Dillon PLLC

This week I had the privilege of talking to Rebecca LeGrand, a partner at Kaiser, LeGrand & Dillon PLLC in Washington, DC.  She has vast experience representing individuals facing criminal charges in federal court or subject to a government investigation. Before joining Kaiser, LeGrand & Dillon, Rebecca worked as a litigator at Williams & Connolly LLP and Robbins, Russell, Englert, Orseck, Untereiner & Sauber LLP, where she represented both individuals and corporate clients in high-stakes civil and criminal litigation.  Rebecca also worked as a volunteer attorney at the Office of the Federal Public Defender for the District of Maryland, where she helped clients navigate complex sentencing issues and criminal investigations.  Rebecca graduated from Yale Law School, where she was the co-editor-in-chief of the Yale Journal of Health Policy. Her undergraduate degree is from Brown University and she has a master’s degree from Duke in evolutionary biology.  I hope you will love getting to know Rebecca as much as I did. What drew you towards a career in criminal defense? I like being on the side of the underdog, and working with individuals who desperately need someone on their side when it feels like all the powers that be have turned on them. You have your own criminal defense firm with two other partners. Can you describe your path to opening up your own firm? I was looking for a different way to practice law.  I was incredibly lucky to start my career at Williams & Connolly, which was a great place to learn how to be a litigator, but I never saw myself as a big firm person. I heard stories from the old guard about what Williams & Connolly was like when it was just starting out, and that sounded like such a great way to practice law.  The legal market is different now, but there are still a lot of clients who need zealous, smart, representation and want to (or have to) work with a smaller firm.  I wanted to create that firm, and I got incredibly lucky to find partners who shared that vision. What have been some of your proudest moments in representing clients? I’m really proud of this recent three-day evidentiary hearing where I represented a client in a post-conviction matter.  It is a female client who I believe was wrongfully convicted.  There were so many ways that the system let her down when she was tried and convicted.  Finally having a zealous advocate fight for her and share her story was so meaningful for her and her family.  That responsibility is humbling, and it’s why you do this work.  I’m also very proud of the work that I do outside the courtroom, behind the scenes.  It’s a devastating thing to be charged with a crime at all.  When I can help a client navigate an investigation to avoid criminal charges I know I’ve done something really significant to protect them and their families from that trauma. How did the presence of women mentors or lack thereof impact your career? I wish I’d done more to cultivate mentors in general when I was younger.  It’s so important to have those relationships, but it’s easy to neglect when you are juggling cases and feel like you are spending so much time keeping up with emails.  I didn’t have a lot of women to look to as mentors, and that does make it harder.  Because of that, I really appreciate the women who took time to mentor me even when I was an annoying associate and did not necessarily make it easy – I give a hat tip to Kathy Zecca on that point. There aren’t enough of us out there and we have to stick together. Of the women that you admire in the field, what do you find inspiring about them? Simply that they are putting themselves out there, even when the deck is stacked against them, and finding a way to do the work they want, and doing it well. Most important weapon in your defense arsenal? My science background.  In fact I rely on my science background in defending clients, even though I’m not working anywhere near a lab anymore. My science training taught me to approach evidence in a rigorous way.  And I really enjoy working with numbers and big data sets, which is an important skill when I’m dealing with, say, a complex financial case.  Sometimes I get to use science even more directly—like cross-examining a government expert—but I use that training in less direct ways as well to help me think about the facts of a case, and the government’s proof, or lack thereof. Best advice you ever received? ...
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No Indictments in Sandra Bland Death, but Prosecutor Says It’s Not Over

A Texas grand jury this week issued no indictments associated with the death of Sandra Bland, 28, who was found dead by an apparent hanging in her jail cell this past summer. Bland's death made national headlines because the African American woman was pulled over for a routine traffic stop, allegedly got into an altercation with the officer over a lit cigarette, and was found hanging by a trash bag in her jail cell after only three days in custody in Texas. Local officials vehemently denied that Bland was mistreated, and the grand jury's failure to indict in the criminal case seems to support those claims. But Darrell Jordan, the special prosecutor, said that "the case is still open," and that grand jurors would reconvene next month to discuss other aspects of it, according to the New York Times. Bland Family Responds Bland's family suspect that Sandra was mistreated because she was black. Her parents filed a wrongful death suit in August against a Texas trooper, the Waller County Sherriff's office, and her jailers -- they blamed authorities for their daughter's death and do not believe she would commit suicide. Bland's family responded to the grand jury's decision through their lawyer, Cannon Lambert. "We are unfortunately disappointed by the fact that our suspicions regarding this sham of a process have come to fruition," said Mr. Lambert, who is based in Chicago. Mr. Lambert said he was unsure of what to make of Mr. Jordan's statement that the grand jury would return to work in January, saying, "We would like very much to know what in the heck they're doing, who they're targeting and if it has anything to do with Sandy and her circumstances." Background on Bland Sandra Bland, who was from the Chicago area, was in Waller County, Texas this past summer because she had accepted a job at her alma mater, the nearby Prairie View A&M University, a historically black institution. Bland's family does not believe she would commit suicide because she was an activist, recording videos about racial issues, including policing. The last video Ms. Bland was known to appear in, unfortunately, is that of the trooper who used a dash cam to record her traffic stop for a failure to signal lane change. In it, the trooper physically struggles with Bland after she refuses to put out her cigarette and is reluctant to exit her car, slamming her head and expressing pleasure about it, among other abuses of power. For those disappointed that the trooper, the county, and Bland's jailers appear to have gotten away with something this week -- possibly even murder -- special prosecutor Jordan said, "The case is not over. That's what I'm stressing right now. The case is not over." Criminal Defense Counsel If you face charges as a result of a traffic stop or anything else, do not delay. Speak to a criminal defense attorney about your charges and get help getting them resolved. Related Resources: Browse Criminal Defense Lawyers by Location (FindLaw Directory) Traffic Arrest FAQ (FindLaw) Can the Police Set Up roadblocks for any Reason? (FindLaw)
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How Much Do I Have to Steal to Be Charged With a Felony?

The fifty states all define crimes slightly differently, so there is not a single blanket answer for when a theft graduates from a misdemeanor to a felony. The difference between a misdemeanor and a felony is the severity of the crime involved, or in the case of a theft, the value of what was stolen. But there is more to it. Three factors impact a theft charge: what was stolen, how much was stolen, and the alleged thief's prior record. Petit or Grand? Perhaps you have heard of the expression petit theft (sometimes also called petty theft). Petit means small in French and petit thefts are small crimes, or misdemeanors. Some states limit petit theft to up to $500 or $1,000, charging a defendant with a felony if the item stolen is worth more than the statutory amount. But some states may charge differently depending on the type of item stolen, perhaps distinguishing between livestock and labor or services. Depending on the state there may also be a separate crime for a particular type of theft. Theft applies to almost anything stolen, including goods, money, livestock, or the value of labor and services. General or Specific? Depending on the state, the theft will either fall under the small or large category, petit or grand. But some types of theft get separate categories all their own. Obviously, stealing a car is a big deal. So much so that grand theft auto is its own, separate, felony charge. Grand means big in French and grand theft is simply a big steal. Prior Convictions Again it depends on the state, but a prosecutor can generally charge someone more severely when they have prior convictions for the same type of crime. Theft is a crime of moral turpitude, legally speaking, and it does tend to be punished more severely the more the defendant is accused. Depending on how the state statute is written, it is possible to steal something of minimal value -- like a candy bar -- and still trigger a felony conviction resulting in an extensive prison sentence. At that point, the charge is not based on what was stolen or what it was worth but on the defendant's own record in combination with the theft. It is also important to note that theft is considered a crime of moral turpitude for immigration purposes and even a conviction for the most minimal theft can impact an application. Got Caught? If you or someone you know has been charged with theft or anything else, do not delay. Speak to a criminal defense attorney right away. Criminal convictions can have serious consequences in all areas of a person's life. Get help defending yourself. Related Resources: Browse Criminal Defense Lawyers by Location (FindLaw Directory) Larceny Penalties and Sentencing (FindLaw) What Is the Statute of Limitations for Theft? (FindLaw Blotter)
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Can the President Bypass Congress on Gun Control?

Gun control advocates have long sought to close the so-called gun show loophole that allows people to buy firearms without submitting to the same background check requirements imposed on licensed dealers. But congressional attempts at passing such legislation have thus far been fruitless. So President Barack Obama may decide to take matters into his own hands. The Los Angeles Times is reporting that the Obama administration is considering the use of an executive order to expand background checks on gun sales. How do these orders work? And can the president really pass gun control laws without congressional approval? Going Solo It's no secret that Obama wants stricter gun controls. The president pushed for expanded background checks after the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting three years ago, but that legislation died in the Senate. He tried again after the Umpqua Community College shooting in October, but measures for more background checks and bans on sales to people on the government's anti-terrorist "no fly" list both failed. Now the White House is looking to circumvent the legislature altogether. According to reports, officials have been working on an executive order that would use existing laws to require all (or nearly all) gun purchases to be cleared by the same background check system.While the order has not been finalized, Obama is said to be looking at expanding license requirements by defining what it means to be "in the business" of dealing guns -- those deemed in the business are required to perform background checks while those that aren't don't. If occasional sellers like those at gun shows are required to obtain a license to sell firearms it would also expand background check requirements. Chief Executive Order Leaving to one side the question of whether tougher gun control laws will lead to fewer shooting deaths (even though evidence suggests that they do), the issue becomes whether this exercise of presidential power is even legal. An executive order is a policy statement that interprets and directs the implementation of existing federal statutes, congressional provisions, or treaties. Executive orders aren't so much new laws as they are changing or clarifying the policy on existing laws, and generally aren't used without some congressional approval. And executive orders are still subject to judicial review for constitutionality. Hence Obama's delay in formally announcing or implementing an executive order on gun control. Despite his desire to make it more difficult for violent people to purchase firearms, drafting an order that will accomplish that and appease enough congresspeople to be successfully implemented may prove as politically intractable as the legislature. Related Resources: Obama Looks to Expand Background Checks for Gun Sales (Time) Obama's Gun Proposals Target Mental Health Too (FindLaw's Law and Daily Life) Will Obama's Executive Order on Student Loans Pay Off for You? (FindLaw's Law and Daily Life) Obama's Executive Order on Immigration: 5 Things You Should Know (FindLaw's Law and Daily Life)
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5 Reasons Criminal Trials Are Often Delayed

Although an accused criminal is often arrested immediately following an alleged crime, that person's criminal trial may take years to complete because of delays in the proceedings. The ongoing trial of accused Colorado theater gunman James Holmes, for example, was delayed several times before jury selection began earlier this week. According to Yahoo! News, the trial has been delayed for two and a half years, more than three times the timetable recommended by the Supreme Court of Colorado for felony criminal cases. The case has already had five trial dates and two judges, with a request for a third denied. In addition, more than 1,700 motions, notices, orders, and other court documents have been filed in the case. What are some of the more common reasons for delays in a criminal trial? Here are five: Psychiatric evaluations. Criminal trials may be delayed while the defendant undergoes psychiatric evaluation to determine whether or not he is fit to stand trial. The trial of another accused gunman, Jared Loughner -- who was convicted of killing six people in a shooting in which former Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords was also injured -- was delayed for more than a year after Loughner was found mentally unfit. Loughner eventually plead guilty. Change of venue. In high-profile cases like Holmes', defense attorneys often ask for a change of venue, arguing that it'd be impossible for their client to get a fair trial in the jurisdiction where the crime occurred. This may lead to delays, even if the request is eventually denied, as it was in Holmes' case. More time needed to prepare. Trial delays may also be granted if attorneys can show they have not had adequate time to prepare. Judges generally have wide discretion to grant delays in order to allow attorneys to prepare or review evidence. But these requests may also be denied, as it was in the trial of George Zimmerman when his attorneys requested a six-month delay to ready their case. Scheduling conflicts. If an attorney involved in the case has a scheduling conflict with another case, a judge may agree to delay a trial in order to accommodate the attorney. In some instances, a judge may even agree to delay a trial for more personal reasons, such as the birth of a lawyer's grandchild. Emergencies. Personal emergencies, such as medical issues or family issues, may also delay a trial. But criminal trials are generally bound by a defendant's constitutional guarantee of a speedy trial (though this can potentially be waived). The need for a speedy trial may compel a judge to deny a request for a continuance, even if it means an attorney is obligated to appear in court along with her newborn baby. Find more information about criminal proceedings, criminal procedure, and a defendant's constitutional rights at FindLaw's section on Criminal Trial. Related Resources: Browse Criminal Defense Lawyers by Location (FindLaw) Zimmerman Seeks 6-Month Trial Delay (FindLaw's Blotter) Why Do DUI Cases Take So Long to Resolve? (FindLaw's Blotter) Judge Urged to Reject Rod Blagojevich Trial Delay (FindLaw Blotter)
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